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20110701
20110731
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KRCB (PBS) 16
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Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
in three weeks the president continued to press for a big deal to raise the debt ceiling and to reduce the deficit by $4 trillion. >> i am still pushing for us to achieve a big deal. but what i also said to the group is if we can't do the biggest deal possible, then let's still be ambitious. let's still try to at least get a down payme on deficit reduction. we are obviously running out of time. and so what i have said to the members of congress is that you need over the next 24 to 36 hours to give me some sense of whayour plan is to get the debt ceiling rais through whatever mechanisms they can think about and show me a plan in tes of what you are doing for deficit and debt reduction. if they show me a serious plan, i'm readyo move. even if it requires some toh decisions on my part. and i'm hopeful that over the next couple of days 'll see this long jam broken because the american people i think understandably want toee washgton do its job. >> president obama ruled out a 2.4 trillion plan prosed by house republicans. >> in my expectation is that you will probably see the house vote on
have overinterpreted the mandate from 2010. so we will have a big debate in 2012. there's no question about that. and an important debate. but i'm not sure that the voters will resolve it finally so that whoever is in power in 2013 can be able to go in the direction that they say they wt to. >> if you don't get the debt problem resolved, he knows it's going to nip at his heels at ever turn, no longer how long he's president of the united states. that's the underlying problem. even if you get to that point, there's a disagreement, i think, ideologically about what the government's role ought to be in that kind of economic policy. >>e continue this evening the documentary filmmaker and photographer with interesting ideas, not only about filmmaking, but also interviewing. >> i don't think that i discover that isn't there already. i would, again, describe it differently. i would say it's a desire, not to impose some idea of what a person is like on the movie that i'm making, but a process of discovery, of trying to uncover, in some way, something new, something interesting, something vita
. >> reporter: the leaders said the convention was valuable, but as always the big challenge will be turning talk into action. i'm kyung lahton at lam best palace in london. >> kim will have a special report from the holy land next week. >>> in alabama, faith-based groups are among those challenging a new immigration law scheduled to take effect in september. the new state law requires police to check the immigration status of anyone they stop for another violation. it will be a crime to knowiny transport or house an illegal immigra immigrant. some churches are helping to educate the community about the new legislation those who fear they could be deported are for the care of their children in case they are forced to leave the country. and if i could go to washington, i would say let my people stay. this is the land of flowing with milk and honey, they came from misery and slavery to a place where they could earn a living for their family and they ve hope for their children, and to send them back is not right. >> other states are also adopting tough immigration laws, but in usually conservat
we have a small wall and we're gradually moving to a big wall. and we'l graduly see one brick after another. it's hard work. it's partly imagination, a lot of it is perspation. i mean aot of it is just real grind in the laboratory. it needs money it needs resource. it needs focus d i ink there's many really good people including some at my own institution rockefeller university who are doing excellent work in this area. >> where are we in terms of are reaping t benefits of the map of the human again ly. >> switch to the genome. >> yes. what i can say about that. the first thing is some people have been a little disappointed because they felt you know we got the genome that was nearly the end of the story. >> dow understand their disappointment. >> i understand this because in fact we should have made it clear as scientists is actually the beginning of the story. i have a metaphor for this. if you were writing a play, the sequence of the genome is like having the list of characters at the beginning of the play. and the job, you can't write the play without the list of characters, tha
and protecting itself. >> to which one answer might be "so why is it so big?" i mean, it is a vast territorial power which has, of course, significant ethnic minorities. they have large territories. >> rose: so you're suggesting that there is a history of chinese imperialism and any other historian who suggests that... >> no, no. i think that henry kissinger is clearly right. that it is not an eansionist power inhe sense thatfor exame, russia was. expanding constantly but i think... >> rose: and certain after the war. >> but i think that what you see already is a chinese strategic doctrine and kissinger, i think, would not dispute this which stakes an ambitious claim to a spheref influence as we rightly said and that would provoke conflict so i i think we're entering very very difficult times >> rose: well, your oxford colleague neil ferguson suggests that nationalistic forces will overwhelm and that there will be a conflict between... in some way between the united states and china. >> well any historian who has looked at the history of the rise and fall of great powers would say such shifts
. >> that money could make a big difference to a lot of people. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy productive life. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: high-level democrats and republicans alike said today's meeting at the white house marked the beginning of the end game in reaching a final deal on deficit reduction. the president and congressional leaders convened in the white house cabinet room, amid talk of a grand bargain involving social security, medicare and tax reform. when it was over, mr. obama made an unscheduled appearance in the briefing room. >> i thought it was a very constructive meeting. people were frank. we discussed the various options available to us. everybody re-confirmed the importance of completing our work and raising the debt limit ceiling so that the full faith and credit of the un
brings another startling turn in this story. todas big turn was the dpe sigs by rupert and james murdoch james being his son and head of his british operations, to do 180-degree turn raer late in the day and having told the parliamentary committee that's going to hold a hearing on tuesday that they would not attend james murdoch saying ther loosely "i can't make it that day, i'll make it some other day. they then... summons were issued by the parliamentary committee which had fairly serious implications and they changed their minds. so we now know that come tuesday we will have the three principal executives that are in the frame on all of which, which is rurplt himself, his son, and rebek brooks who is the chief executive as you know of the murdoch subsidiary here in london being called to testify before parliament. catherine, where do you think the next term is in this story? >> well, john said it'saken a different turner. it's taking so many differen turns everyday that that's a really difficult questio i think that it is likely for the moment to stay focused on news international bec
think it's got to work on a big scale. and i think it's got to be affordable. >> so, where are they? >> it has to work in the real world. at chevron, we're investing millions in solar and biofuel technology to make it work. >> we've got to get on this now. >> right now. the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: another blistering forecast greeted millions of americans today. the unrelenting hot weather broke a series of records, and triggered warnings in state after state. >> judging by the -- large portions of the country the sweating is way from over with temperatures over 100 degrees and above. >> how hot do you think it is. >> 109. >> in wichita, a high yesterday of 111 degrees, breaking a record set in 1982. it was expected to hit 103 today, the 20th straight day of t
a big difference to a lot of people. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy producve life. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: congress and the president labored again today to break the debt ceiling stalemate. there were conflicting signals, but no outward signs of movement. "newshour" congressional correspondent kwame holman begins our coverage. >> reporter: the u.s. capitol swirled today with claims of progress toward agreement on cutting the deficit and raising the government's borrowing limit. one report had it that house speaker john boehner and president obama were close to a major deal, but at the white house, press secretary jay carney quickly denied it. >> there is no deal. we are not close to a deal. we are-- obviously the president is in discussions with all the leaders of congress, as
the procedure which was then banned. a court found in his favor, spurring a big public debate. >> it may prevent suffering in individual cases, but in every single case, it denies a conceived human life the right to live. we should not do that. >> no one takes the decision to have the in vitro fertilizaon lightly. it is anxtrely stressful procedure. both physically and psychologically, and it carries a social stigma. >> couples to go this route already have a long history of suffering behind them. ultimately, arguments like that won, but the use of the procedure will be strongly restrict it. the only parents with hereditary illnesses will qualify. a few hundred couples are likely to benefit each year. >> i am relieved that a sensibl world will affect the majority and couples are not prevented from seeking treatment in germany. >> this person finally knows where he stands after campaigning for the procedure the last six years. >> later, the discussion over embryo screening. >>> britain's biggest selling sunday paper has been shut down at amidst the phone hacking scandal. "news of the world" journ
on a big scale. and i think it's got to be affordable. >> so, where are they? >> it has to work in the real world. at chevron, we're investing millions in solar and biofuel technology to make it work. >> we've got to get on this now. >> right now. and the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the firestorm over phone hacking in britain put media magnate rupert murdoch on the hot seat today before a committee of parliament. along with his son and a former top executive, murdoch faced close questioning, and a closer encounter with a pie plate. outside, the sidewalks were crowded with protesters against the murdochs and their newspapers, and british prime minister david cameron. inside, rupert murdoch was confronted by british lawmakers over allegations that his tabloids hacked the p
of connection with you. >> we looked at the... the whole context, and was there someone trying to big note themselves by suggesting their connection to us? we don't have sources that we know about. and i had never heard the name bradley manning before. i never heard the name bradass87 before. ( applause ) >> smith: at a major conference last year, assange was also asked if manning was his source for the video and the cables. >> there's been this us intelligence analyst, bradley manning, arrested, and it's alleged that he professed in a chat room that he leaked this video to you, along with 280,000 classified us embassy cables. i mean, did he? >> we have denied receiving those cables. >> smith: assange was facing a dilemma. if wikileaks acknowledged having more documents alleged to have come from manning, he risked further harm to his source. did you discuss internally, amongst yourselves, whether or not the war logs and eventually the cables could further jeopardize him? >> there was discussion about, you know, we have a situation where there is a young man held in military prison under in
speaking, it's a big blow for the karzai administration. you know, it'sçç confidant, relatives, high-level aides going back into april some of them are being killed. but more than who is doing it or who it's happening to, i would put it altogether by saying it's a real danger for the stability of the government and it makes it seem as if as the americans and nato begin to pull out, it's really not clear who is in control. it's really not clear where these chips are going to fall. >> you wrote aboutç that ioç oe of the recent pieces for the post that the tenor of kabul is changing. people seem to be preparing for that day when the last u.s. troops are out of there and trying to figure out where the power is going to be. >> exactly. people are very nervous and scared. the last time a super power was involved in afghanistan and suddenly left, which was of course the soviet union in 1989, it wasn't long after that that civil wary rupted which was incredibly vicious and destructive and destroyed much of the capital. nobody thinks that's going to happen now but they're worriedç that s
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)